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Legislation in Limbo?

View profile for Daniel Crook
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As Parliament is dissolved pre-election – what happens to legislation in the process of being put on the Statute Books?

A snap election has been called with all eyes on the upcoming debates – leaving little time for the government’s current round of legislation to become Law.  Some legislation will be rushed through in what is known as the “wash-up” period”, but many Bills may fall by the wayside despite their apparent importance.

The likely laws not to make the cut include :-

The Renters Reform Bill.  The much-hyped legislation removing “no fault evictions”, the banning of fixed term tenancies and ensuring homes must be of a decent standard may fall by the wayside. The Bill also made provision for tenants to keep pets and would prevent Landlords discriminating from against those on benefits and/or with children.

Smoking Ban – the Tobacco and Vapes Bill is likely to be snuffed out – despite it being a central plank of Rishi Sunak’s election speech that the next generation would grow up smoke free.

Leasehold Reform.  The Bill was intended to stop apparent abuses in the system, by making it easier and cheaper for tenants to buy their freehold, manage their block of flats or extend their leases.

The Terrorism (Protection of Premises) Bill, also known as Martyn's Law named after one of the victims of the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing Mr Martin Hett, is likely to be deferred until the next Parliament. Under the Bill Local Authorities and venues would be compelled to have preventative terrorism plans and suitable training in place.  Due to the importance of the Bill and its cross party support, it is likely to be taken up regardless of which colour rosette is in power.

Football Governance Bill. The aborted attempt to form a European Super League had induced the government to bring forward a bill to introduce higher tests for new owners and directors to jump, to ensure clubs didn’t fall into the wrong hands. Another function was to ensure powers were in place to ensure a fair distribution of finances between the the Premier League and the English Football League in the absence of agreement. (“Horse and bolted” anybody)? The MP behind the earlier football review and intended Act – Tracey Crouch has already indicated she is standing down at the impending election.

It will be interesting to see which Bills are picked up again after the election, or whether some of the Bills were purely there for the benefit of politicians soundbite politics. Watch this space.

Legislation in Limbo?

View profile for Daniel Crook
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